August Single

Third International, Chemical Eyes + Bonus

August 31, 2012 | by Skope

I had the pleasure of reviewing Third International’s ‘Entre Las Americas’ back in May for Skope (http://skopemag.com/index.php?s=Third+International) and I knew then that this group has got something special. The mastermind behind it all, Andrew Pearson, is back with a single that includes two songs: “Chemical Eyes” and “Good Friday at Little Rock”. This time around Andrew decided to record both tracks on his own while also handling all vocals and instruments. The result is instant success because I feel Third International nailed it on all accounts!

Just as before on ‘Entre Las Americas’ the material is definitely socially & politically conscious except this time around Pearson really wants to open the floodgates of mass communication. What I mean by that is simply for ALL people to not just complain about our problems anymore but actually “Get Up, Stand Up” and have a universal VOICE as ONE! The first single is called “Chemical Eyes” that centers around global warming but really the theme is for each and every person to help by taking direct action toward improving and in the end saving this planet. The song really adds a cool mix of sound and I have to say that vocally, lyrically and musically it made a BIG impact on me. On the next song “Good Friday at Little Rock” you will pick up on some bluesy rock guitar riffs that truly add finesse to the whole picture. This number was actually written as a poem in 1996, which won a New York Times award and was even published in a book of newly recognized American poets that same year! This poem was called “Of Moonlight and Wishes” and now in song form it is “Good Friday at Little Rock”. Andrew Pearson/Third International felt that the timing was perfect for this material to resurface for the good of all mankind.

Speaking in terms of Pearson’s poetic ability, I am highly impressed with how well the songs flow and sound. It feels completely natural from beginning to end and that is exactly how Third International/Andrew Pearson intended it all along. No BS, no lies; just real music with a message and a purpose. But most importantly “Chemical Eyes” and “Good Friday at Little Rock” are meant for YOU to be the VOICE. Third International/Andrew Pearson is ready for change and I’m pretty sure not that fake Obama change that offers absolutely nothing to individuals. Ready…set…GO!!!

By Jimmy Rae (jrae@skopemag.com)

www.reverbnation.com/thethirdinternational

 

Artist: Third International

Title: Chemical Eyes/Good Friday at Little Rock

Review by Nick DeRiso

 

As Third International’s double-sided single “Chemical Eyes/ Good Friday at Little Rock” spins, one thing becomes utterly clear: There’s no round hole to put this square peg.

“Chemical Eyes,” as uncategorized as it is intriguing, could rightly be called a stew of sounds – each of them more palpably dangerous than the next. It boasts an ambling old-west guitar signature, but it’s not country. There’s a gravel-scarred vocal, but it’s not a blues. There’s also a relentless, chest-thumping rhythms, but it’s not dance music.

 Third International continues stirring the pot, offering barely heard ruminations on religion, government, empty philosophizers, economic disparities, other well-laid plans that have come undone. The results are not so much menacing, as they are deeply, darkly scarifying. A serrated guitar cuts across this murky landscape, toward the end, then a weirdly transfixing keyboard answers back with a long, dry buzz – and, just like that, “Chemical Eyes” has disappeared over the horizon, like an only half-remembered dream.

 Meanwhile, “Good Friday at Little Rock” lurches out with a gurgling, Mark Knopfler-esque riff, set amongst a clattering, scronky rhythm. Again, there’s something close to blues happening here, and something just as mysterious – in its own way – as “Chemical Eyes.” Even as Third International poses more questions about the easy explanations this world provides for complex, maybe unknowable, conundrums, “Good Friday” continues to create its own deeply involving musical enigmas. 

Come in without preconceived notions, and these songs will transport you to another place.

 
 

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Genre: Rock
Label: Paracelsus
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Tracks

1. Chemical Eyes
2. Good Friday at Little Rock
 
Third International
Chemical Eyes

Andrew Pearson has released albums in the past with the rest of the outfit, Third International, but on these two tracks, decides going solo is best for interpretation purposes. Both tracks are cloaked with social and political influences (heck, the name of the band itself is political in nature), and have real meaning.
“Chemical Eyes” speaks of how political and religious leaders are only actors in this game of life. We, as humanity, should learn to function and think without being puppets, without being told how to think. The inspiration for the chord changes during the lead in are from a trip in a cab Pearson once took in which the driver couldn’t keep a steady pace. It provides a neat hook that makes the listener want to hear where the song takes them. This song has a sort of spacey, acid rock feel. The only complaint I have is sometimes Pearson’s voice gets lost in the cool music, and on a song with a message, I’d like to hear it all.
“Good Friday at Little Rock” definitely has more of a bluesy vibe, with a low beat and nice guitar work. The song was originally written as a poem in 1996 and won a New York Times award. It talks about how Little Rock isn’t a money hungry place to be, there’s not a problem with overcrowding, and just in general, the laidback feel to the place. It’s a cool, funky track.
This two track combination provides a different flavor of music than you usually hear in rock. It’s a little spacey, a little funky, fresh, and dirty at the same time. It sends out a message, and I’m always a fan of music that makes you think. I’ll definitely be checking out some more of Third International’s music.
October 23, 2012
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